Generally, are fitness watches too aggressive (not just Garmin)?

You all know that I love Garmin's product, just not the quality control or lack of LTE.  But I will seriously be looking at one when they release the LTE Fenix Sport or Forerunner 955.  

That being said, I've seen a trend with all fitness devices that is a bit disturbing.  They push you a little TOO much.  Do more, run more, more cardio, more low aerobic, more this, more that.  Now, as I'm aging I'm finding that it's best to do less but stay consistent.  Don't run every day, but maybe every other day.  Don't push push push.   This constant push to do more and more has caused me more small injuries and other smaller problems, that I didn't have before these fitness watches became a thing.

More Achillies problems, more muscle soreness, cramps, knots.  More aches and pains.   Normally they wouldn't get this bad, but hey, I have to "close the rings", "Get my VO2 up", "Move damnit, the watch says so".

I'm starting to ignore much of it and slow things down to a more common sense sort of schedule.  The goal?  Stay fit and HEALTHY.  Not push push push.

I know when you are younger, this is typically ok, this "Push syndrome", but when you get above say 50, things just don't recover so fast.  

Do you all think that there needs to be more thought put into how these devices drive us?  I don't think the current programming is healthy on the body.

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  • I agree. I am only using the watch to track my workouts but don't push myself based on the data it provides.

    First of all, I don't trust the data accuracy at all, even if I wear chest strap on most of my training sessions. Secondly, it's much beneficial knowing and listening to your body; your watch won't feel soreness or pain.

    As you wrote, consistency matters more than pushing yourself to your limits. If you have an injury, you probably cannot do workouts for days or even weeks and it will also affect to your future abilities.

    Metrics are just numbers which can show your long term progress and can even motivate you but they are still just numbers. You must know what is good for your body. 

    That's just my 2 cents

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  • I agree. I am only using the watch to track my workouts but don't push myself based on the data it provides.

    First of all, I don't trust the data accuracy at all, even if I wear chest strap on most of my training sessions. Secondly, it's much beneficial knowing and listening to your body; your watch won't feel soreness or pain.

    As you wrote, consistency matters more than pushing yourself to your limits. If you have an injury, you probably cannot do workouts for days or even weeks and it will also affect to your future abilities.

    Metrics are just numbers which can show your long term progress and can even motivate you but they are still just numbers. You must know what is good for your body. 

    That's just my 2 cents

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