Generally, are fitness watches too aggressive (not just Garmin)?

You all know that I love Garmin's product, just not the quality control or lack of LTE.  But I will seriously be looking at one when they release the LTE Fenix Sport or Forerunner 955.  

That being said, I've seen a trend with all fitness devices that is a bit disturbing.  They push you a little TOO much.  Do more, run more, more cardio, more low aerobic, more this, more that.  Now, as I'm aging I'm finding that it's best to do less but stay consistent.  Don't run every day, but maybe every other day.  Don't push push push.   This constant push to do more and more has caused me more small injuries and other smaller problems, that I didn't have before these fitness watches became a thing.

More Achillies problems, more muscle soreness, cramps, knots.  More aches and pains.   Normally they wouldn't get this bad, but hey, I have to "close the rings", "Get my VO2 up", "Move damnit, the watch says so".

I'm starting to ignore much of it and slow things down to a more common sense sort of schedule.  The goal?  Stay fit and HEALTHY.  Not push push push.

I know when you are younger, this is typically ok, this "Push syndrome", but when you get above say 50, things just don't recover so fast.  

Do you all think that there needs to be more thought put into how these devices drive us?  I don't think the current programming is healthy on the body.

Parents
  • Sincerely, I was more active before using sports focused watches. I was walking/running 15-20 km a day (at least thru 2013-2018), going to the gym, doing gym based exercises at home and whatnot. Now, if I take my dog for a walk/run for 5-7 km/day if the weather alow it and going to the gym 4 times a week, it seems enough for me.

    Before using serious watches, that "tell" me I'm over reaching or over training, I didn't see much positive results in my fat loss goal and muscle mass. I always had sleep issues and put the lack of goal achieving on it, but it seems like it was a good idea for me to monitor with a watch my all day activity. If only Garmin will do something to the sleep tracking, making it like Fitbit's, that would really help everyone more. For 18 years I worked only night jobs and sleeping only 3 to 6 hours a day, maybe an occasional nap once in a while and an all day sleep tracking would be a "miracle" for me. I used to wear a Fitbit Charge 3 on my other wrist just to have an exact idea how many hours of sleep I get per day, naps included.

    In conclusion, this kind of watches helped me tone down a bit and don't push too hard every day.

    LE: Fitbit Ionic made me really over train a lot of times!

Reply
  • Sincerely, I was more active before using sports focused watches. I was walking/running 15-20 km a day (at least thru 2013-2018), going to the gym, doing gym based exercises at home and whatnot. Now, if I take my dog for a walk/run for 5-7 km/day if the weather alow it and going to the gym 4 times a week, it seems enough for me.

    Before using serious watches, that "tell" me I'm over reaching or over training, I didn't see much positive results in my fat loss goal and muscle mass. I always had sleep issues and put the lack of goal achieving on it, but it seems like it was a good idea for me to monitor with a watch my all day activity. If only Garmin will do something to the sleep tracking, making it like Fitbit's, that would really help everyone more. For 18 years I worked only night jobs and sleeping only 3 to 6 hours a day, maybe an occasional nap once in a while and an all day sleep tracking would be a "miracle" for me. I used to wear a Fitbit Charge 3 on my other wrist just to have an exact idea how many hours of sleep I get per day, naps included.

    In conclusion, this kind of watches helped me tone down a bit and don't push too hard every day.

    LE: Fitbit Ionic made me really over train a lot of times!

Children