Generally, are fitness watches too aggressive (not just Garmin)?

You all know that I love Garmin's product, just not the quality control or lack of LTE.  But I will seriously be looking at one when they release the LTE Fenix Sport or Forerunner 955.  

That being said, I've seen a trend with all fitness devices that is a bit disturbing.  They push you a little TOO much.  Do more, run more, more cardio, more low aerobic, more this, more that.  Now, as I'm aging I'm finding that it's best to do less but stay consistent.  Don't run every day, but maybe every other day.  Don't push push push.   This constant push to do more and more has caused me more small injuries and other smaller problems, that I didn't have before these fitness watches became a thing.

More Achillies problems, more muscle soreness, cramps, knots.  More aches and pains.   Normally they wouldn't get this bad, but hey, I have to "close the rings", "Get my VO2 up", "Move damnit, the watch says so".

I'm starting to ignore much of it and slow things down to a more common sense sort of schedule.  The goal?  Stay fit and HEALTHY.  Not push push push.

I know when you are younger, this is typically ok, this "Push syndrome", but when you get above say 50, things just don't recover so fast.  

Do you all think that there needs to be more thought put into how these devices drive us?  I don't think the current programming is healthy on the body.

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  • Completely agree with these sentiments, and much like OldAssDude, I'm 63, but I'm also a 'serious' masters level cyclist (UCI Gran Fondo level qualifier) and train around 18-22 hours each week, but get a bit obsessive with making sure I get my Steps target each day ;-)

    I find Garmin's assessment of my training efforts at times laughable (as does my coach, who is an ex world tour professional cyclist). My take on it is that most of the training level assessments are guesstimates, and more often than not very inaccurate

    I recently purchased an F6 Sapphire to act as an adjunct to the times when I'm not on the bike/training, and put up with its bugs (numerous), inaccuracies (wrist based HR etc) for over a month, returned it for a full refund nd happily went back to my AW4 (less than great battery life BUT has LTE and a far better screen ... at least Apple's 'black' is 'black', wrist HR is very good)

    I'm not entirely sure why Garmin, in particular, go the 'push harder' mentality beyond it being a purely marketing thing to separate themselves from the herd of other fitness devices out there

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  • Completely agree with these sentiments, and much like OldAssDude, I'm 63, but I'm also a 'serious' masters level cyclist (UCI Gran Fondo level qualifier) and train around 18-22 hours each week, but get a bit obsessive with making sure I get my Steps target each day ;-)

    I find Garmin's assessment of my training efforts at times laughable (as does my coach, who is an ex world tour professional cyclist). My take on it is that most of the training level assessments are guesstimates, and more often than not very inaccurate

    I recently purchased an F6 Sapphire to act as an adjunct to the times when I'm not on the bike/training, and put up with its bugs (numerous), inaccuracies (wrist based HR etc) for over a month, returned it for a full refund nd happily went back to my AW4 (less than great battery life BUT has LTE and a far better screen ... at least Apple's 'black' is 'black', wrist HR is very good)

    I'm not entirely sure why Garmin, in particular, go the 'push harder' mentality beyond it being a purely marketing thing to separate themselves from the herd of other fitness devices out there

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