Generally, are fitness watches too aggressive (not just Garmin)?

You all know that I love Garmin's product, just not the quality control or lack of LTE.  But I will seriously be looking at one when they release the LTE Fenix Sport or Forerunner 955.  

That being said, I've seen a trend with all fitness devices that is a bit disturbing.  They push you a little TOO much.  Do more, run more, more cardio, more low aerobic, more this, more that.  Now, as I'm aging I'm finding that it's best to do less but stay consistent.  Don't run every day, but maybe every other day.  Don't push push push.   This constant push to do more and more has caused me more small injuries and other smaller problems, that I didn't have before these fitness watches became a thing.

More Achillies problems, more muscle soreness, cramps, knots.  More aches and pains.   Normally they wouldn't get this bad, but hey, I have to "close the rings", "Get my VO2 up", "Move damnit, the watch says so".

I'm starting to ignore much of it and slow things down to a more common sense sort of schedule.  The goal?  Stay fit and HEALTHY.  Not push push push.

I know when you are younger, this is typically ok, this "Push syndrome", but when you get above say 50, things just don't recover so fast.  

Do you all think that there needs to be more thought put into how these devices drive us?  I don't think the current programming is healthy on the body.

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  • What I have noticed over the years is the more advanced devices (Garmin, Suunto, Polar) are geared more towards athletes and tend to push you harder, and the more basic devices (apple watch, fitbit, samsung, etc...) are geared more toward the regular person just trying to stay active.

    I have owned them all and that has been my experience so far anyway.

    I find myself in the middle area of regular and athlete, and it's hard for me, because the apple watch makes me think I'm doing great, but my garmin F6XPS tells me I'm only doing fair to good and making me push too hard sometimes. I'm also in between wanting basic and advanced features as well. I like some of the advanced features, but get to caught up in them when there are too many.

    I'm 62 years old, and do at least 1 activity every day 7 days a week (1 to 2 hours average daily), even if it's just a 3 mile recovery walk, and I have gotten at least 10,000 steps a day 7 days a week for going on 2 years straight now.

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  • What I have noticed over the years is the more advanced devices (Garmin, Suunto, Polar) are geared more towards athletes and tend to push you harder, and the more basic devices (apple watch, fitbit, samsung, etc...) are geared more toward the regular person just trying to stay active.

    I have owned them all and that has been my experience so far anyway.

    I find myself in the middle area of regular and athlete, and it's hard for me, because the apple watch makes me think I'm doing great, but my garmin F6XPS tells me I'm only doing fair to good and making me push too hard sometimes. I'm also in between wanting basic and advanced features as well. I like some of the advanced features, but get to caught up in them when there are too many.

    I'm 62 years old, and do at least 1 activity every day 7 days a week (1 to 2 hours average daily), even if it's just a 3 mile recovery walk, and I have gotten at least 10,000 steps a day 7 days a week for going on 2 years straight now.

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