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Stair -like heart rate graphic

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  • Stair -like heart rate graphic

    Has anyone else seen this before?

    As you can see in the pics below, a normal heart rate graphic ( during a set of " run at x speed - recover " series ) should look like this (1st pic).

    But the other day I got this odd graphic , where the heart rate goes up at a constant rate, resulting in a "stair like" graphic, event when the speed goes down, like during recovery time.

    BTW, this is the 2nd time I notice this with my FR 235.

    normal HR graphic stair-like HR graphic

  • #2
    Somewhat similar issue discussed here:
    https://forums.garmin.com/forum/into...eart-rate-data
    Current: nuvi 255, eTrex 30, Forerunner 310XT, Forerunner 735XT, HRM-Tri, HRM-Swim, SDM4, Virb Elite, tempe
    Retired: eTrex Legend, Swim

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    • #3
      Didn't see that before. Will post there, although it relates do FR935 and this a 235
      Last edited by ALIERI556; 11-30-2018, 07:16 AM.

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      • #4
        Yeah, I have seen that before with my wifes activities on a 235, i believe it is from not having a good 'lock' on your heart beat before the activity is started. Do some light warmup and standing around with the Activity screen up (40sec-2min), before you hit start and run to give it a chance to lock onto your heart beat before it starts going changing rapidly.

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        • #5
          My experience is that if at ANY time the wrist HR loses "lock" it will go into an estimating mode. In addition it is a "canned" estimate that uses data for the General Public which is currently 40% Obese per a recent evening news report. Because of this the Heart Rate shown are usually much higher than one would expect for someone serious about exercise to buy Gamin equipment. For example due to open heart surgery I am currently in the stage of walking for exercise. Yesterday I did 3 miles on a treadmill at a 14:10 pace with an average heart rate of 98. Note, I ALWAYS wear a Chest Monitor when exercising because the wrist heart rate will NOT maintain a lock if I am doing anything more vigorous than typing on a keyboard. So, when I'm must chilling out at home if I get up to put the dog out the wrist monitor will peg my Heart Rate at something in the 105to 115 range, when all I am doing is walking about 20 ft. BTW, if I happen to have my chest monitor on after getting back from the gym that particular monitor will have my HR in the range of 65-74 beats per minute.

          Bottomline is this, the wrist monitor is JUNK if you are doing anything active because it's operating off some algorithm about 90% of the time and Garmin wasn't wise enough to insist that whoever writes their software (I suspect somewhere in India) build a "learning" feature into that algorithm or at the very least base that algorithm on the average person using Garmin's products, NOT an Obese population model.

          BTW, I was not kidding about Garmin Subcontracting to India for their software. Because what else would explain why after over 2 years of constant updates Garmin still hasn't been able to get the 235 bug free. IMO whoever is doing these updates is introducing new bugs with every update to insure they will always have that income stream.

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          • #6
            ...apparently somehow this involves people from India...

            but yes, it would be beneficial if the HR defaults and estimating were based upon the actual user!

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            • #7
              Speak for yourself Scooter ... you've been on a crusade against the wrist monitor for years now and repeat the same thing over and over. Your commentary does not AT ALL describe my experience. Won't even respond to your software subcontracting 'theory' as it's not worth the effort.

              ALIERI: My wrist monitor is good 90% of the time. What Nick said, however, is very important to getting a good reading throughout your workout IMO ... create the activity and allow a couple minutes for the HR to lock properly, then hit 'start' when the HR looks correct ... makes a huge difference for me.

              Max

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              • #8
                Interesting point about waiting around for the OHR to get a signal. But what happens if you are wearing the device 24/7? Surely then there should be no need to wait around? We have two 935s and a F5+ in this house. My wife uses her 935 without an external strap and seems to get good results. I can't use the 935 or F5+ without an external strap otherwise I get junk.

                What is clear from many posts on many different devices is that OHR works for some, but not for others. If in doubt, I'd always suggest an external strap. But if OHR works for 'you' that's great. I am hoping that the time will come when I can get reliable heart rate data from OHR during 'active' activities. I don't have issues when not exercising.

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                • #9
                  Philip: I wear my 235 24/7. I'll create my run when I get home from work, but not Start yet. Changing, up/down stairs, then finally sitting down to tie my shoes. When I'm ready to go, my HR will often be something crazy in the 150's or higher. If I began my run right away, my first 5-10 minutes of my run is often ruined - HR way too high and erratic - it finally 'snaps' to the correct HR eventually. But if I sit still on my stairs for 1-2 minutes longer, I can watch the HR suddenly rapidly begin declining and snap to where my sitting HR should be. Then I go for my run. My HR for these scenarios is usually nearly perfect aside from a momentary spike now and then.

                  That extra 2 minutes before my run makes all the difference for a good HR reading, for me at least.

                  Max

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                  • #10
                    In a way this is what I see. If I move around, my OHR is not stable enough to use. When I rest, or move at an easy pace, it is. Out of curiosity, what is your normal heart rate when you run at a steady aerobic pace?

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                    • #11
                      I don't race, but rather just do a 5K everyday after work. On a typical 8min/mi pace, I'll have an average HR of around 150. At 7.30min/mi pace, I'll have an average HR of around 153-55. Before I begin, I wait for low 70's before I hit START (which I believe to be accurate).

                      Right now I am on the track, so my graphs all have a gradual increase then level off for the rest of the run. In the summer, I run trails and you can definitely see the incline/decline of the run represented in the HR graph, although I have found it tends to roam around in high digits right after I level off from a big incline, but always snaps back to reality relatively quickly (30 -60 seconds). So yeah, it seems to have a bit of trouble transitioning from uphill back to level or downhill, but it doesn't really affect my average too much.

                      Max

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