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  • Stair climbing not accurate

    Hi all. Just got my VA3 on Friday and have noticed that stair climbing is very in accurate. I’ve gone up and down a flight of stairs about 5x this morning and my stair counter widget shows 1 flight!

  • #2
    This may provide some insight .

    https://support.garmin.com/en-US/?fa...chQuery=Stairs

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    • #3
      hi Runnerguy101, I can confirm for my FR935 that Garmins Stairs info linked by TMK17 worked for me...

      and this point from the info changed it
      • Do not skip stairs (walking up every other stair)


      Used to take two steps at a time, changing this into one step at a time for the first six steps worked for me.

      happy stairs stepping
      Last edited by OnlyTwo; 09-16-2018, 12:19 PM. Reason: sorting letters

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      • #4
        Simply put, the barometric altimeter in the VA3 (or at least in many VA3 samples) does not work, as witnessed in many threads about it in this forum and independently of what any garmin support web page. says. As a consequence, the stair counter is a de facto pseudorandom number generator.

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        • #5

          Can't agree. However, I only have the watch a week!! But it's counting my floors ALMOST perfectly at home and at work. I went upstairs to give my daughters a kiss before going to work this morning, 1 floor recorded. Yesterday's count was 24 floors, when I mentally counted I think 25. I'm happy with that. No perfect, but certainly not a random number generator either.

          Oh, and the set of steps that goes from my basement to my back yard is only 8 feet. I can cheat there. When I get to the top landing, if I raise my arm over my head, I get credit for the floor (10 feet).

          GC
          Last edited by SUSSAMB; 09-17-2018, 09:38 AM. Reason: Please don't quote the post directly above yours. It's unnecessary and simply clutters up the thread. Thanks

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          • #6
            Then either you live in a cool climate or you are a lucky owner of a working sample.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GreatCanadian View Post
              Can't agree.
              Many owners would love to swap their VA3 for yours.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by CeroSeis View Post
                Then either you live in a cool climate or you are a lucky owner of a working sample.
                Yes I'm in eastern Canada. Are cooler climates more favorable? Since I read the earlier posts I've closely monitored the floors and steps readings, and they're practically dead on

                GC

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                • #9
                  Guys I just have to post back here. Since I first saw this thread I have been monitoring how effective my watch is at tracking floors. It rarely misses. So far today I've walked up 2 floors, and my watch says 2 floors. Yesterday it was 8. Most days it is dead on. Rarely out by one floor, and I don't think it's ever been out by two. I am interested in the comment that CeroSeis made above.."Then either you live in a cool climate or you are a lucky owner of a working sample."....I would like to know more about why you think a cool climate can affect the floor readings. Thanks.

                  GC

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                  • #10
                    Hi GreatCanadian.

                    What follows is only speculation: I don't know how the VA3 internals work, then I might be proven wrong.

                    Temperature readings concur with barometer readings in determining the elevation changes after any calibration.
                    The VA3 has barometer and temperature sensor in an unfortunate position, in contact with the bare skin of the wrist. In absence of proper ventilation the temperature sensor returns values which are biased towards the higher temperature value of the skin. When skin heat and moist build up during an activity, the T reading raises up to 33/34 °C even if the ambient temperature is around 25/26 °C. Many of us experimented a CORRELATION (not CAUSATION, which is different and has to be proven yet) between such phenomenon and a steady decrease of measured elevation during activities, and on uphill sections, too. In addition, sweat tends to clutter the sensor ports and completely screw the baro readings up.
                    My watch behaves almost perfectly if I take it off the wrist and fasten it to the bike handlebar, but only when the climate is not too hot.

                    Of course wrong estimates in baro and elevation changes strongly affects stairs count, too.

                    I guess periferic blood circulation has a role, too, and some may have cooler skin temperature than others on average.

                    Such misbehavior is less evident, as far as I can see on my VA3 sample, when the weather is cold and dry (only two weeks a year here on the mid-Mediterranean coast.), which I believe helps the skin and watch stay cool and at stable temperature.

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                    • #11
                      I am located in South East Mediterranean. I bought the watch last December and the readings were quite OK. During summer the floor count and the altimeter readings had been way off. I even had more than 60 floors up counted by VA3 in a day I barely did 10. In many occasions I had 20 up 60 down, or floors being counted while walking outside (at more than 35 deg C) in an absolutely flat surface. The last days the temperature has dropped quite significantly and I have seen a drastic change in the floor count. It measures the floors quite correctly, both up and down. I also experienced a much improved altitude graph within an activity, although still with an unreasonable decent. The difference between start and stop at the same point, went from 60-70m to 10m.

                      All these, together with the observations mentioned above, make me believe that there is indeed a design issue with the watch in regards to where the sensors are located. If it is so, unless Garmin could find a really innovative correction algorithm to perform a sw correction in the altitude (if that would be possible at all), I would expect that this problem will remain forever.

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                      • #12
                        I appreciate your responses. What you both imply is very intriguing, and makes some logical sense. It certainly warrants some research on my part. Thanks very much for your insights!
                        GC

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