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  • #61
    I have made quite a number of these custom maps that all have the full 100 tile limit. Try though I might, none of them are any larger than 36MB. The format is just *really* limited and only suitable for mapping small areas. Really, you won't need a memory card at all to use custom maps, they will easily fit in your Oregon's internal memory.

    The only reason you might use a card for this is testing - a corrupted map might cause your unit to lock up. If the map is on a card, you can just remove it. If it's stored in internal memory, you will have to try a couple tricks to get the device into USB mode and delete the file.

    Your assumption about "100 square miles" isn't really correct. It depends on the resolution of the imagery that you use. Consider that each tile can be no larger than 1024x1024 pixels. So with 1 foot per pixel imagery (high resolution aerial photography), it would cover 1024x1024 feet (.2 miles x .2 miles). At 10 foot/pixel resolution (works well for 24k topo maps) it would cover 10,240 x 10,240 feet (2 miles x 2 miles). Multiply these by 100 tiles to get the full coverage; and you can do the math for other resolution source imagery.

    What are the 50k maps you want to make? Are they in the US or Canada? If so, consider just purchasing Birdseye topo. It will give you unlimited downloads of the same maps for $30. And there isn't any practical limit to the size of the area you can cover except the size of your memory card: https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=98816

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    • #62
      Originally posted by OSTROFF01 View Post
      What are the 50k maps you want to make? Are they in the US or Canada? If so, consider just purchasing Birdseye topo. It will give you unlimited downloads of the same maps for $30. And there isn't any practical limit to the size of the area you can cover except the size of your memory card: https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=98816
      I have 100k topos of the whole of Timor Leste (East Timor) and 50k topos of all of the Solomon Islands. I was going to load them all onto SD cards in sections to cover each country and swap them out as I need to. The Solomon Islands Govt. also wants to sell the SD cards with maps on and I am helping them pro bono. Right now I'm in the Solomons.
      My other problem is that all the Timor Leste ones are osfx3 files and I cannot think how to convert them to jpg without losing the georeferencing data. It took me hours of boring work to georeference all those tiles, there's about 60 of them and I didn't really enjoy doing that. I have to georeference all the Solomon ones anyway as I only have the images so I shall make sure they are all jpgs before I start. Ideas on the conversion would be welcomed.

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      • #63
        Ah, OK, now I understand. I think you mean ozfx3 and not osfx3, right? These are compressed OziExplorer maps. Have you considered just using OziExplorer instead of Garmin. It is really MUCH more capable if you want to use raster-based imagery.

        OziExplorer CE runs on any Windows CE based device and I have used it on a number of them such as Mio, Magellan and HP GPS'es.http://www.oziexplorer3.com/ozice/oziexplorerce1.html You can load huge maps and they are more responsive than the Garmin Custom Maps It works well on the Magellan Triton 1500, for example - I wrote about using it here awhile ago: http://forums.gpsreview.net/viewtopic.php?t=12646 They also have an Android version but I haven't tried it.

        However this may not be the solution you want. There may be other ways to convert ozfx3, but Globalmapper is one program that will do it. This is actually a new feature - didn't realize it was possible until I tried just now but it worked perfectly. Once you get the map into Globalmapper it will be very easy to "grid" it into 1024x1024 tiles and create a .kmz. Globalmapper also supports the Garmin Custom Map format and can send it directly to your GPS if you want.

        Globalmapper is a very powerful GIS program that can do almost anything, I use it everyday. It's not cheap, but would save you a lot of time. There's a free demo version available for download that does almost everything but export data: http://www.bluemarblegeo.com/global-mapper/

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        • #64
          you can get a cheap 1gb/2gb microsd card for about 10$ maybe even cheaper, lower capacity ones below 512Mb may be even harder to find and not much cheaper. you can use the card for storing Birdseye maps from garmin if you decide to try the service,
          or just keep all the custom maps you make on the card, just not all at once in the custom maps folder, you can use another folder and you can move the kmz files as needed to the custom maps folder by plugging the unit to a pc/laptop, or even a mobile phone which accepts microsdcards and lets you move files.

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          • #65
            Thank you OSTROFF01 and JBADILA. All very useful. (of course, yes, I did mean ozfx3). I have just converted from Magellan to Garmin, I failed to realise Magellan was running Windows CE and what the positive implications of that might be, from user comments Garmin software just looked more robust - so much to learn. Anyway, stuck with the Oregon now awhile. Following JBADILLA's comment, next time I am in Australia, I shall purchase two huge microSD cards, see if I can load all of Timor Leste on one and all Solomons on the other and shuffle the active map in and out of Custom Maps as needed, if that works, great idea. I shall experiment with my huge ozfx3 Timor file in Globalmapper, if it can regrid it and retain the georeferencing I would be happy to buy it; unfortunately my internet is too unreliable to dowload it so that will have to wait for the next Australia trip too.

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            • #66
              When you're ready to try, this will point you in the right direction hopefully. First open the large .ozfx3 file in Globalmapper. Then choose File > Export Raster/Image Format > KML/KMZ

              On the Options tab, un-check Super Overlay then click the button that says "click here to calculate spacing in other units". Now choose meters or feet in the the Units dropdown menu (whatever you're more comfortable with). You will then see the resolution of the existing file in meters/pixel (for example). This is where you can re-sample the image at any resolution you like. You may want to experiment to see the largest numbers you can use that provide acceptable results - this will let you cover the largest possible area with your custom map. Click OK.

              Now click the Gridding tab, click the "specify individual grid cell pixel size" button and enter 1024 x 1024. This will break down the image into the largest sized tiles that Garmin allows.

              Now you can export the file and see how many tiles it creates. It will take a bit of trial and error to find a good resolution and keep within the 100 tile limit.

              Unfortunately, I don't think the free trial will let you do any of this however, since it doesn't allow data export. You can try contacting Globalmapper however. They used to provide a free 30 day key that would unlock all the program features so you can evaluate it.
              Last edited by stephencreek; 02-20-2012, 09:23 PM.

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              • #67
                Has anyone figured out how place multiple maps on the auxilliary sd card. I seem to only be able to see the first one on the Garmin/customMaps/ location. I created a 225 square mile (sections) map from 1:24k Igage Alltopo maps with 60% of full resolution in only a 10 mbyte file. I would like to load a number of these in my 16 gbyte memory chip. What kind of a file structure on the sd card will the Garmin Montana support? Does anyone know? Igage has a demo video showing how to take their maps and directly load them into a Garmin state named gps receiver. http://www.igage.com/mp/Video_ATM%20...po9Garmin.html

                harkey@zianet.com

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                • #68
                  The Montana supports a maximum of 500 individual .jpg images. Each image can be no larger than 1024x1024 pixels. Typically, all of these images would be encapsulated in a single .kmz file, although multiple files should also work. But the limitations above still apply. Beyond that, it's an "all or nothing" proposition. Regardless of how many separate files you use, everything is grouped together on the GPS into a single custom map. And you can only enable/disable the entire set of all the images. You can't turn individual images on or off.

                  If you want to use more than one group of custom map images, you need to put them on separate cards and physically swap them in the GPS.

                  -Boyd

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                  • #69
                    here is the reply from Mr. Mark Silver at igage maps:
                    You can put up to 100 tiles in ‘THE’ folder. They all just show up in the correct place.
                    After 100 tiles, you can put other coverage anywhere else on the card, however you will have to move the folder contents around (so pull out the card and put in a PC.)
                    Or you could get a bunch of small cards and put 100 tiles on each card.

                    I believe this to be purposeful crippling of the ‘Custom Map’ function by Garmin. They are in the business of selling maps too, you know?

                    Mark



                    --

                    Mark Silver KD7NKY
                    iGage Mapping Corporation
                    1545 S 1100 E STE 1, Salt Lake City UT 84105

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                    • #70
                      Not sure where the 100 limit is coming from. Older models only support 100 map tiles, but the Montana supports 500. The rest is basically as I said, the device will group all of the tiles into one map. I agree this is a big limitation. But it's nothing new. Just read back through old threads in this forum, the problem goes back to the very beginning.

                      Now, from what I understand, the newest devices - Oregon 6xx and Monterra - will allow you to have multiple custom maps and turn them on/off individually. However they still have a limit of 500 tiles maximum (500 total tiles in all maps on the device). The Montana can't do this however.

                      -Boyd

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by OSTROFF01 View Post
                        Not sure where the 100 limit is coming from. Older models only support 100 map tiles, but the Montana supports 500. The rest is basically as I said, the device will group all of the tiles into one map. I agree this is a big limitation. But it's nothing new. Just read back through old threads in this forum, the problem goes back to the very beginning.

                        Now, from what I understand, the newest devices - Oregon 6xx and Monterra - will allow you to have multiple custom maps and turn them on/off individually. However they still have a limit of 500 tiles maximum (500 total tiles in all maps on the device). The Montana can't do this however.

                        -Boyd
                        So if I install too many tiles, what order does the Montana use--the internal chip first? It seems random to me. I guess I can hook up the Montana to my computer and move some of the files into a dummy file instead of the Garmin custom maps folders? Why is there no information in the manual? There seems to be no point in having the second memory chip at all. I bought the garmin 1:24k map for NM, but it is so dumbed down there is a lot of missing information, such as section numbers, detailed elevation lines, etc. I am quite disappointed in the unit. I can install good maps in it but not enough to be useful for hiking over the SW part of NM without swapping maps in and out. Surely Garmin can give us an update to be able to better use it's capability.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by HARKEY@ZIANET.COM View Post
                          So if I install too many tiles, what order does the Montana use--the internal chip first? It seems random to me. I guess I can hook up the Montana to my computer and move some of the files into a dummy file instead of the Garmin custom maps folders? Why is there no information in the manual? There seems to be no point in having the second memory chip at all. I bought the garmin 1:24k map for NM, but it is so dumbed down there is a lot of missing information, such as section numbers, detailed elevation lines, etc. I am quite disappointed in the unit. I can install good maps in it but not enough to be useful for hiking over the SW part of NM without swapping maps in and out. Surely Garmin can give us an update to be able to better use it's capability.
                          Just found the solution to all the Garmin Montana display problems. Bought a 7" Android tablet for $130 and spent $12 on a complete set of United States 1:24k maps, installed the maps with no trouble and it runs like a charm--the whole state with no problems! You can save huge areas to the memory chip and it will work without local wifi or internet. Option to place your present position in the center of the fabulous screen. GPS on the tablet is probably not as good as the Montana, but it comes up in about the same length of time. I can now take the unusable 16gig chip out of my garmin and put it in the tablet. Better display, fast load. You can have your 12 to 14 zoom levels, high resolution, backlit. Garmin messed up.
                          Last edited by rrbv; 07-05-2014, 11:35 AM.

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                          • #73
                            Hi all. Anyone have experience with cusom maps that contain multiple zoom levels? Maybe there is technical description somewhere how to create such files (calculating tile size and coords, extent at cetrain zoom level etc), someting like http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Slippy_map_tilenames. Here is example of such file http://www.filedropper.com/nppsloboz...ap12000nlevels.

                            I googled, but can find only general information about creating custom maps with single zoom level, similar to first post.

                            Thanks a lot and sorry for my English.

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                            • #74
                              i think you did a good job!

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                              • #75
                                Using the information in this thread i was able to to up a image generated by "gdaldem hillshade" below the map. This now looks like this. Unfortunately, as mentioned here before, all polygons are now under the hillshade image and are not visible any more (notice no water in the image). Is it possible to change the way how the image is combined with the polygons? The best way would be to "multiply" the colors of the polygon with the hillshade image, but drawing polygons above the image, but with some alpha transparency would also do it.
                                I tried changing the alpha value of the water polygons in the map's TYP file, but this seems to have no effect.

                                EDIT: A third possibility whould be to draw the polygons directly on the hillshade image using some map renderer (maperitive maybe?) and image manipulation tools such as gimp or imagemagick. I consider this a poor man's solutions as the resolution of the images limits the map quality (and garmin devices seem to be *PRETTY* limited in image overlay capabilities).
                                Last edited by thomas001le; 01-05-2015, 03:51 AM.

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