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DEBNJAI
01-23-2010, 10:17 AM
Hi,

I just participated in the Mumbai Half Marathon 2010 and was surprised to find that my average HR was recorded as 192 bpm and my max was 200 bpm. I had touched 200 twice during the race. My race time was 2h 03mins 36 secs.

My question is that is this reading correct? It seems excessively high - my age is 37 and as per the rule of the thumb, the max HR should be 183 or thereabouts.

http://connect.garmin.com/activity/22757415


Regards

Jai.

TWOSTAGE
01-23-2010, 12:39 PM
The 220 minus age thing is just an approximation. I'm 50 and I get my HR into the 180s most times I exercise. When I was younger I used to get my HR upto 225 which would have made me minus 5 age wise.

I would imagine it was quite warm during the run which would have bumped your HR up also.

DW152
01-23-2010, 04:33 PM
192 is a pretty high average HR, but not unreasonable if you were really pushing the pace the entire race. You might want to look at the HR graph to see if it makes sense, or if you had some erratic results.

The 200 max HR is entirely believable. I'm 10 years old than you and my max HR is about 186 bpm. My training buddy is your age and his max HR is about 200. On the other hand, I know people with lower max HRs that are younger and older. As TWOSTAGE says, the 220-age is an approximation, and a rather poor one at that IMHO. But again, I'd suggest that you look at the HR graph to see if it made sense -- did you reach your max HR at the end of the race, when you were tired, dehydrated, and sprinting to the finish? Or maybe at the end of a hill?

EDIT - I just noticed that you provided a link to your race. Your HR looks pretty typical of a race -- a steep rise at the beginning, and then a more or less constant, elevated HR during the race.

DUETDEUX
01-24-2010, 03:08 AM
I agree with the others here... I'm 39 and have a MHR just below 200. This is just what I've learned from a year of monitoring how my heart operates, and one of the benefits from logging in the first place.
If you are serious about your sport - I'd suggest you go get a proper lactate test. It's usually not very expensive, and the only way to know for sure.

So far, the approximation from my logging is good enough for me, but I'm sure I'll go for a proper test at some point.

192bpm average is quite high though, I would guess that it was quite hard?

BSTARR67
01-26-2010, 09:22 AM
I agree with all the comments on maximum heart rate. I'm 53, and often get up to 188 near the end of a very hard workout.

However, I would suggest that averaging 192 for more than two hours is nearly impossible for an athlete of any age. With all the reports in these forums of poor HR accuracy from Garmin chest straps, I would be very skeptical.

... Bob

T_SMIT
01-26-2010, 11:20 AM
One thing that I've seen occasionally (possibly when the HRM is worn too loose) is that it will give a beat for each step you take. The footfall jars your body (and the HRM) enough that it affects the contact between the electrodes and your chest, and that causes a pulse to register.

The reason that is significant in this case is because your cadence for both feet can be (should be) in the 190 per-minute range.

If you do more testing with the HRM under different conditions then you will figure out what a 'normal' heart rate is and also if your HRM usage is prone to incorrect readings.

BSTARR67
01-26-2010, 11:28 AM
One thing that I've seen occasionally (possibly when the HRM is worn too loose) is that it will give a beat for each step you take. The footfall jars your body (and the HRM) enough that it affects the contact between the electrodes and your chest, and that causes a pulse to register.

The reason that is significant in this case is because your cadence for both feet can be (should be) in the 190 per-minute range.


Mr. Smit, I agree completely. This is a common problem in the fitness equipment field, specifically treadmills. I can see how it could happen with marginal chest strap, too. The average of 192 is, as you say, right at a common foot cadence during running.

... Bob