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View Full Version : garmin vs. foot pod (nike+training)



makupad
10-01-2010, 08:24 PM
I recently ran a 10k race (as advertised) with very steep hill climbs. After the run my fr110 and my friend's fr110 showed the total run to be only 8.5k. But another runner using nike+training with foot pod said that he registered it to be 9.6k. Question: which is more accurate garmin or nike+training?:confused:

evan.oltmanns
10-09-2010, 01:34 AM
Interesting; what device was the other runner using in conjuntion with nike+training?

A foot pod alone cannot give very accurate readings when used on runs that cause your stride to change. When you think about it, what does the foot pod itself record? All that a foot pod knows if your typical stride (probably based on a input that YOU entered into a device) and how many steps you took.

As an example: if your typical stride on a flat surface is 30 inches (which you input into the pod) and your race was 70% uphill that cause your stride to reduce to 20 inches, how could that alone give you an accurate reading?

I probably did nothing to answer your question but I hope I at least taught you something you didn't already know. I would think that a GPS-assisted device would provide a more accurate reading than a foot pod device.

DW152
10-09-2010, 06:01 AM
A foot pod alone cannot give very accurate readings when used on runs that cause your stride to change. When you think about it, what does the foot pod itself record? All that a foot pod knows if your typical stride (probably based on a input that YOU entered into a device) and how many steps you took.

This is not true. The Garmin footpod uses an accelerometer. It does have to be calibrated, and that calibration factor does depend a bit on stride mechanics, but it is not based on a simply stride length X number of strides.

ADAMJOWITT
10-12-2010, 05:26 PM
My wife has a nike+ sportband and I have a FR 405. We find that the GPS distance recorded by the 405 is much more reliable than the nike+ system.

The nike+ is reasonably accurate if you run at the same pace that you calibrated the sensor at, but once your pace changes the distance and therefore pace recorded become less accurate. We have found that if she runs faster than the calibration pace the device records as smaller distance and therefore slower pace than the actual pace and conversely when running slower than the calibration pace the device records a greater distance and pace than actual. I have heard of some people owning multiple sensors and calibrating them for different paces (e.g. one for easy runs, another for tempo runs etc) and then using the appropriate sensor for that days run, but we haven't bothered with that yet.

rayrobinson0311
11-23-2010, 01:21 PM
In general GPS will always be more accurate - but there is what is considered an 'acceptable' margin-of-error allowed by the US Gov't which owns the GPS satellites.

julien321
11-23-2010, 04:15 PM
In general GPS will always be more accurate - but there is what is considered an 'acceptable' margin-of-error allowed by the US Gov't which owns the GPS satellites.

The government used to add an encoded timing error that made consumer equipment less accurate, however that was removed circa 2001. Now all devices receive the same maximum accuracy of the GPS satellite data. The amount of error can be from as little as about 1 meter to over 30 meters depending on many factors.

atj777
11-24-2010, 06:16 PM
This is not true. The Garmin footpod uses an accelerometer. It does have to be calibrated, and that calibration factor does depend a bit on stride mechanics, but it is not based on a simply stride length X number of strides.
I agree with this and found my Garmin footpod to be initially very accurate (even without calibration). I ran on an Olympic track at various speeds and distances and found it to be with 2-3%.

However, that was initially. After a month or so of use it started to show completely wrong pace data (and so distance data) - like showing me running at 1:50/km when I was running around 4:00/km or even slower. If you ran a 100m in 11 seconds your average pace would be 1:50/km. I had the footpod replaced a month ago and the replacement has started doing the same thing.

Kris_Dy
01-04-2011, 05:37 AM
My wife has a nike+ sportband and I have a FR 405. We find that the GPS distance recorded by the 405 is much more reliable than the nike+ system.

The nike+ is reasonably accurate if you run at the same pace that you calibrated the sensor at, but once your pace changes the distance and therefore pace recorded become less accurate. We have found that if she runs faster than the calibration pace the device records as smaller distance and therefore slower pace than the actual pace and conversely when running slower than the calibration pace the device records a greater distance and pace than actual. I have heard of some people owning multiple sensors and calibrating them for different paces (e.g. one for easy runs, another for tempo runs etc) and then using the appropriate sensor for that days run, but we haven't bothered with that yet.

This is exactly what I have noticed using Nike+. Twice a week i run the same route. With the garmin forerunner 305 (GPS measurement) the variation in measured distance is way less and more accurate than with nike+ accelerometer. With the tool on http://www.awsmithson.com/tcx2nikeplus/ I upload my garmin data to the nike+ site. I use each tool for what it is best: iPod for music, Garmin for measurements, Nike for motivation.

t_smit
01-04-2011, 08:51 AM
I agree with this and found my Garmin footpod to be initially very accurate (even without calibration). I ran on an Olympic track at various speeds and distances and found it to be with 2-3%.

However, that was initially. After a month or so of use it started to show completely wrong pace data (and so distance data) - like showing me running at 1:50/km when I was running around 4:00/km or even slower. If you ran a 100m in 11 seconds your average pace would be 1:50/km. I had the footpod replaced a month ago and the replacement has started doing the same thing.
Do you wear the footpod inside the shoe? If so, your battery contacts may be fretting due to occasional overloads caused by running surface irregularities. Remove the battery, place a small drop of mineral oil (baby oil works too) on each of the positive and negative battery contacts, and reassemble the footpod.